Hillary Clinton: Pneumonia ‘Not a Big Deal’

Hillary Clinton: Pneumonia ‘Not a Big Deal’
Hillary Clinton: Pneumonia 'Not a Big Deal' The incident comes less than 60 days before the Nov. 8 presidential election and at a time of intense campaigning against Republican rival Donald Trump.

Democrat Hillary Clinton said on Monday she could resume presidential campaigning in a couple of days after a bout of pneumonia that she initially had not believed was "that big a deal."

  • Clinton's health scare after she almost collapsed at an event on Sunday, causing her to cancel some campaign trips, revived concerns about a tendency toward secrecy that has dogged her campaign, and underscored perennial worries about the medical fitness of candidates for one of the world's most demanding jobs.
  • "Well, it will be in the next couple of days. ... I just want to get this over and done with and get back on the trail as soon as possible," she said in an interview on CNN on Monday night, adding she had ignored doctor's orders to rest.
  • "I just didn't think it was going to be that big a deal."
  • Her campaign acknowledged on Monday it may have been too slow disclosing her pneumonia diagnosis after she nearly fainted at a New York memorial ceremony for the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. She was diagnosed with the lung infection on Friday.
  • "I think that in retrospect, we could have handled it better in terms of providing more information more quickly," Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon told MSNBC earlier in the day.

HEALTH PROBLEM NOW THE FOCUS OF HILLARY'S CAMPAIGN DEFENSE

(WASHINGTON) - The health problem was the latest blow for the Democratic presidential nominee at a time when Republican rival Donald Trump has erased most of her lead in national opinion polls and is competitive again in many battleground states where the Nov. 8 election is likely to be decided.

Clinton, 68, said she had dealt with similar episodes of dizziness before.

“You know, it is something that has occurred a few times over the course of my life. I’m aware of it and usually can avoid it,” she told CNN.

Asked if she passed out during the incident on Sunday, she denied it, saying 

“No, I didn’t. I felt dizzy and I did lose my balance for a minute. Once I got in. Once I could sit down. Once I could cool off. Once I had some water, I immediately started feeling better.”

Her campaign said her husband, former President Bill Clinton, would campaign on her behalf while she rests.

Both Clinton and Trump, 70, said they intended to release more of their medical details in the coming days, as their campaigns gear up for the November election.

Questions about the incident reinforced the perception of Clinton as secretive, a view fueled by the controversy surrounding her use of a private email server while serving as President Barack Obama's secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.

A federal investigation of that issue said she was "extremely careless" in her handling of classified emails, but did not recommend criminal charges.

Trump said on Monday that health was a campaign issue but he did not attack Clinton over her physical condition. "I just hope she gets well and gets back on the trail," he said in an interview with Fox News.

For the record, pneumonia is an acute infection of the lungs. It's a more common problem than most people think. Usually pneumonia is a mild disease, but some forms are very dangerous and require a hospital stay. In all cases, one needs to seek care from their health care provider.

Pneumonia can affect just one lobe of the right or left lung, a whole lung, or both lungs.

Many different kinds of germs infect the lungs and cause pneumonia. Infected lungs leak fluids and shed dead cells. This material clogs up air sacs and makes it hard for the lungs to do their job of getting oxygen into the blood. Without enough oxygen, none of the cells in your body work as they should.

Pneumonia generally lasts about two weeks. However, one may feel tired or weak for a month or more after the lungs clear up.

Contributed by Alana Wise and Jeff Mason - REUTERS

Article by Doc Burkhart, Vice-President, General Manager and co-host of TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles.
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